Saturday, January 11, 2014

Guinness

pint Guinness Irish Stout gluten free beer low gluten test results draft celiac intolerance
Beer: Guinness
Style: Irish Dry Stout
Originating country: Ireland
Brewing location: St James's Gate, Dublin, Ireland
Ingredients: Roasted malted-barley, hops, water, Guinness Yeast
Alcohol by volume: 4.2%
Format tested: draught pint purchased in London, England
Beer Advocate Rating: 79/100 (draft)
Ratebeer Rating:  88/100 (can)
Test kit: E-Z- Gluten

Miscellaneous
  • The biggest selling markets for Guinness in 2004 were (in order): Great Britain, Ireland, Nigeria, US, Cameroon. 
  • It’s not black. Guinness is actually a deep, ruby red, a color the company attributes in part to the roasting of malted barley during the beer’s preparation.
  • 40 percent of all Guinness is brewed and sold in Africa
  • Nicknames for Guinness: the black stuff, Liffey water, black custard, diesel
  • Guinness tastes better in Ireland (I can vouch) and nobody knows why
Test result photo

Results Guinness Irish Stout gluten free beer low gluten test results draft celiac intolerance



















Test result
Very high positive at 20 parts per million (ppm), meaning it is well over 20 ppm gluten. Though standards vary from country to country, according to the FDA, "in order to use the term 'gluten free' on its label a food must meet all the requirements of the definition, including that the food must contain less than 20 ppm gluten". It is said that products with a gluten content below 20 ppm are suitable for people with celiac disease.

My experience drinking Guinness
I am not sure where I fall in the gluten tolerance spectrum. I definitely know what it feels like to be "glutened" i.e. gluten exposure, but I have not deliberately pushed my gluten consumption limits with any food or beer. I have not had anything beyond a sip of Guinness since being diagnosed gluten intolerant.

27 comments:

  1. I have celiac disease but have found I can have Guinness with no ill effects. I wondered why and found the site that I linked below. Basically, Guinness contains no wheat and is made from barley BUT the barley does not contain pure gluten; it has a gluten-like molecule. Think of it this way: if you can't have butter, you can have a butter-like substitute like margarine! So this gluten-like molecule does not trigger gluten trigger. Enjoy! https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCcQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.foodrepublic.com%2F2013%2F05%2F28%2Fglutards-foray-minimal-wheat-beers&ei=3zpzVLjiEceZyATJmYLgAQ&usg=AFQjCNF9f1wlF14-ZBAiTRbE3G0Oc47-Ow

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  2. That is an interesting observation Silly Celiac. I don't eat wheat. Not for medical reasons, just a dietary choice. I always heard that Guinness was wheat free as well. So it's the barley that creates the positive gluten test is what you are saying. I wonder how many of the other beers tested contain no wheat but test positive for gluten due to barley. Wheat and gluten are not one in the same it appears.

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    Replies
    1. 'Wheat and gluten are not one in the same it appears"

      duh. Many many many beers don't contain wheat. All contain gluten if made traditionally...barley, hops, water yeast.

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  3. Silly Celiac,
    I'm glad you are able to consume Guinness with no ill effects... However, Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by a protein composite found in wheat, rye, AND barley. So suggesting that people with Celiac need not avoid barley seems a bit careless. Many beers are wheat free... but that doesn't make them free of gluten. The gluten in barely counts. Perhaps you have a wheat allergy and were misdiagnosed... In any case, I felt people should be warned to be cautious before willingly exposing themselves to gluten...

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  4. I agree with Silly Celiac. I have a lot of problems with craft beers now and am definitely gluten intolerant. But I can drink Guinness with no ill effect - it's been a real bonus

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  5. Diagnosed Coeliac...tolerate Guinness with no issue whatsoever also.Of course no one knows what (if anything) consumption of it does to the intestinal villi and antibody levels. Guinness really should man up themselves and do some proper analysis of their product.

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  6. Wheat, barley, rye and oats all contain similar proteins which is often bundled together under the name gluten. The wheat protein is gluten, barley is hordein, rye is secalin and oats is avenin. All four of them contain the same protein fraction, called gliadin, which causes trouble in celiacs. If you are gluten intolerant (a simple gut reaction as opposed to the full blown celiac auto immune disease), you may be able to tolerate barley, rye and oats, which contain lesser amounts. If you are wheat intolerant, steer clear of wheat. But to claim that celiacs can consume any of the four grains safely is misleading and to encourage them to do so is irresponsible. As a celiac, you may believe you can consume Guinness without ill effects, but all celiacs know that damage may not be perceptible, and villous atrophy and all the other wonderful sides effects of the disease can happen silently.

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    Replies
    1. Fantastically said.

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    2. Wheat contains gliadin i glutenin....gluten is umbrella term for all of the above proteins.

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    3. Oats do not contain gluten! Even the Celia Foundation finally admitted this fact. Wheat, rye and barley. That's it. I have celiac disease and for whatever reason, Guinness does not make me sick.

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  7. first, I was diagnosed with dairy allergies for 5 years. Still always ill. Secondly, I was re-diagnosed and told I was not allergic to dairy and told I had many food allergies with gluten being the main culprit. Every time I consumed bread or beer (Budweiser, ales, almost any amber) my body would react inside 2 minutes with congestion, headaches, snffles, sneezing, stomach ache etc. So I stopped drinking beer and started drinking cocktails instead. The cocktails did not affect me as much as however I could tolerate Vodka. After a trip to Ireland for a wedding I decided the hell with it and I grabbed some Benedryl and decided to drink some Guinness. Some turned into lots and I decided not to take the Benedryl and go with the pain. Turns out no pain no nothing. That was 8 years ago. Now I only drink Guinness and have absolutely zero issues. Now if I have a piece of bread that has yeast I will definitely be sneezing, coughing and everything else. What is weird is that if I make homemade flour tortillas which have no yeast I have zero problems. I mean zero problems. Any of you brainiacs care to comment.

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  8. Whoa! That's fantastic news about Guinness. Must definitely give it a try. So far, the only beer I've found I can tolerate is Corona (corn-based). It's quite good as far as lagers go, but miles away from the real thing (Guinness stout).

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  9. Well said, my husband is coeliac and cannot tolerate even small amounts of gluten, regardless of where it's from. Gluten is a protein found in several grains and must be avoided by coeliacs!

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  10. Just to add to some comments above I have no issue with Guinness either ( diagnosed as Coeliac ) but recently consumed by accident some crisps with dried barley malt vinegar extract and reacted violently to it. If barley was the source of my 'glutened' experience why aren't I having issues with Guinness ?!

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  11. Try Murphy's stout. Tastes better than guinness and gluten free to boot..............

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  12. Coeliacs PLEASE beware. It is GLIADIN that causes the autoimmune response and gluten is only one of many gliadin compounds. Guiness is NOT SAFE for us. Many of the adverse effects, including the predisposition to cancers, MAY not be perceptible after drinking a Guiness but are likely to occur all the same. I am a medical doctor and also a coeliac and much as I would like to drink Guiness (and all barley based beers) the risk to our long term health is just not worth it.

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    Replies
    1. I'm going to start drinking more barley based beer, as i always have.

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  13. I am diabetic and coeliac, I have been drinking cider (zero gluten) and it sends my blood sugar way high and makes me drowsy for a couple of days. If I drink dark ales, porter or stout, even 6-7 pints, no issues whatsoever! Need more info, so please do not try this at home!

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  14. Many commercial breweries use CLARITY FERM from whitelabs in the states as a clarifying agent in their beer.
    This strips the beer of many of its protein molecules via an ensyme added during the fermentation process.IE gluten and is used in concentration to produce Celiac safe gluten reduced beers - Some however insist that this merely breaks down the gluten molecule and hides it but i drink plenty with no side effects

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  15. After reading the comments here, I think that many people who suffer from celiac's disease think that they are stuck with the disease and that's it. My understanding is that celiac's disease is developed from a gluten intolerance. Once the gluten intolerance is recognized and the intake of gluten proteins stops, then the body starts to heal. Once healed, a person (such as in my case) may be able to tolerate a moderate amount of offending proteins with very little damage. So far, I can drink a single pint here and there with not much side effects, but on a regular basis, I drink only Corona. I can have quite a bit of it with no ill effects other than the taste.

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    Replies
    1. Wrong, I'm afraid. Coeliac disease is an auto-immune disorder, and you ARE stuck with it. Please be wary of encouraging people who are no longer experiencing symptoms to go back to a "moderate amount" of gluten. They - and you - might not have symptoms, but the damage is silent, and doesn't stop

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    2. I said... "may be able to tolerate a moderate amount of offending proteins with very little damage." BUT, I see your point about encouraging others and you're right, that might be a problem. Some people are more sensitive than others. Some people are more healthy than others.

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  16. I enjoy Guinness Draught regularly but the others bother me (i.e; dry stout), I'm a celiac who eliminated all pastas, breads etc and Guinness def doesn't bother me, after seeing a lot of other people w the same sentiment, I wonder if there is some misdiagnoses or something, for instance corona bothers me, less than other beers but still, I avoid most beers; Omission Brewing has great tasting gluten free beers, def my favorite if u like lagers, pale or IPAs

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  17. I have awful gluten reactions - colon and espohagus close on me. I bloat like I'm malnurished baby...

    Anyway, Guinness is better on my than Miller or Coors lite. What I've been told is that the roasting of certain malts/barley/etc destroys the gluten -like over-working pizza or pasta doing destroys the enzyme...

    Sounds legit and I've received nods and "hmm"'s from docs and chemists who tend to agree to the logic...

    Bottom line. I can drink it without issue. Haven't tried a 12 pack but I have it without concern.

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  18. I don't have celiac disease, but I'm very gluten intolerant, and I found to my joy that I can drink Guinness with no ill effects whatsoever. It's a pretty wonderful discovery for someone who likes dark beer but can't handle gluten.

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  19. As a coeliac I haven't drunk Guinness in 10 years. I've just stumbled across your website. You report "Very high positive at 20 parts per million (ppm)". Do your records show if a beer is less than 100 ppm (Low-gluten), which I can tolerate? 

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